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Botanical Collections

The Museum manages the fifth largest herbarium in the Western Hemisphere, estimated to include 2.7 million specimens of angiosperms, gymnosperms, pteridophytes, bryophytes, fungi (including lichenized ascomycetes), and algae. The Herbarium was established in 1894 based on acquisitions from the World's Columbian Exposition of 1893.

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The Museum manages the fifth largest herbarium in the Western Hemisphere, estimated to include 2.7 million specimens of angiosperms, gymnosperms, pteridophytes, bryophytes, fungi (including lichenized ascomycetes), and algae. The Herbarium was established in 1894 based on acquisitions from the World's Columbian Exposition of 1893. Numerous botanical expeditions, sponsored or co-sponsored by The Field Museum, have established the herbarium as one of the world's preeminent depositories of Central and South American plants and approximately sixty percent of the phanerogam collections are from these areas.

Important early collectors included C. Millspaugh, J. H. Greenman (Mexico and Central America) and B. E. Dahlgren (Cuba, Brazil and British Guiana). The Flora of Peru, initiated in 1922 by J. F. Macbride is continued today by M. O. Dillon. Specimens generated from this project have provided The Field Museum with one of the world's best collections of Peruvian plants. Macbride also spent nearly ten years in Europe photographing type specimens of South American plants at major European botanical institutions and arranging for exchange of numerous Latin American specimens (many of them unmarked types from the herbaria in Vienna, Paris, Madrid, Geneva, Munich, and Berlin) of collectors that are not well represented in other United States herbaria (e.g., Ruiz and Pavon, Blanchet, Glaziou, Pohl and Schott).

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Collections

These are data on collections from Peru and our series of floristic inventories supported by National Geographic Society and National Science Foundation.
The Botany Department's unique type photograph collection originated in 1929 when J. Francis Macbride, funded by the Rockefeller Foundation, traveled to Europe to photograph herbarium specimens of nomenclatural types.
This part of our KE EMu database provides access to taxon information in the form of taxon pages, including nomenclature and synonymy, descriptions, remarks, notes on distribution and ecology, and images.
The Botany specimen database allow you to search for digitisted herbarium and economic botany specimens held at The Field Museum of Natural History.
The database is searchable by the various fields below, including taxon (at any taxonomic rank), distribution and ecology, or one can search specific localities or regions. Note that for many records, identification is to genus level only.
The inventory of Costa Rican Fungi inventory includes a survey of macrofungi, microfungi, and Lichens (Ticolichen). The searchable database houses about 10,000 records of macrofungi and 20,000 records of lichen.
More than 12,000 economic botany specimens are housed in the Timothy C. Plowman Economic Botany Collection. The collection comprises economic "useful" plants and plant products, with the primary emphasis on seed plants.
The Field Museum is the most important repository in the world of research collections and literature pertaining to the genus Erythroxylum.
Neotropical Epiphytic Microlichens at the Field Museum. An innovative inventory of a highly diverse yet little known group of symbiotic organisms. 
This site is being made to speed up the general identification of dried specimens of Neotropical plants. It will be most useful to professional biologists and others doing species inventories of natural areas, ecology, and ethnobotany.
 The Photo Archives has an extensive collection of botanical images from the past and present.
In the early 1900's, the four scientific departments collected in North, Central and South America, and Africa.
The index and a bibliography of Rolf Singer's 440 publications on mushrooms and related fungi are presented as a searchable database. Currently we are confirming the existence of the type specimens in the herbaria as indicated in Singer's publications.
This dataset contains information on type specimens of tropical lichens, with emphasis on corticolous crustose species.
The herbarium of the Botany Department at The Field Museum holds approximately 33,700 vascular plant type specimens, of which about 27,000 were collected in the New World tropics.