Blogs & Videos: Dinosaurs

Sue's Microbes go to Space

The citizen science project, called Project MERCURRI, is designed to compare microbes from different environments on Earth both to each other and to those found on the International Space Station.  All together, 48 microbial species were selected to blast into orbit aboard the SpaceX Falcon 9 shuttle to the International Space Station for research later this month.

Dino Discovery

Everyone knows that Tyrannosaurus rex was the biggest and baddest thing around during the age of the dinosaurs.  But what else was out there?  What was the biggest thing before the T. rex?   Scientists at The Field Museum and collaborators have uncovered the bones of another large predator in the Cedar Mountain Formation in Utah – one that would have filled the role as top predator of its time and kept T. rex’s ancestors in check! 

How to Recover from a Mass Extinction

A growing number of species in the modern world (nearly 200 in fact!) go extinct every day due to factors such as climate change and habitat destruction. During the earth's history, there also have been a number of 
mass extinctions, like the one that killed off the dinosaurs. Increasingly, scientists are turning to past mass extinctions to gain new insight into what is happening today.

2013 REU Intern Chris Griffen

How to Grow a Dinosaur

CHRISTOPHER GRIFFIN Junior Biology/Geology/Molecular and Cellular Biology major at Cedarville University REU Mentors: Dr. Kenneth D. Angielczyk (Assistant Curator of Paleomammalogy, Geology) and Dr. Sterling J. Nesbitt Symposium Presentation Title: How to grow a dinosaur: the histology and femoral ontogeny of the Middle Triassic dinosauriform Asilisaurus kongwe and implications for the growth of early dinosaurs

From First Grade to the Field Museum: A Paleontologist's Research Comes Full Circle

If you take sample of paleontologists and ask them how they became interested in the field of paleontology, some of them will doubtlessly tell you that they first got hooked on dinosaurs as a kid and things proceeded from there. I am definitely an example of this phenomenon: as far back as I can remember I was fascinated by dinosaurs, and “paleontologist” was almost always the answer when people asked what I wanted to be when I grew up.

2012 REU Intern Franco Gallastegui

Using systematic traits of teeth to test trophic niche evolution in theropod dinosaurs

FRANCO GALLASTEGUI Junior Biology and Geophysical Sciences major at The University of Chicago REU Mentor: Dr. Peter Makovicky (Curator, Geology) Symposium Presentation Title: Using Systematic Traits of Teeth to Test Trophic Niche Evolution in Theropod Dinosaurs

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