From Sticks to Bricks: Why We Stopped Moving and Formed Cities

Today, more than half of the world’s population lives in cities.  To anthropologists like Dr. Bill Parkinson, Associate Curator of Eurasian Anthropology, this is a curious puzzle because humans are natural hunter-gatherers who need space to roam., The Neolithic Revolution, or Agricultural Revolution refers to the time in human history when humans moved away from a hunter-gatherer lifestyle and began to cultivate crops, allowing them to settle in one permanent location. Yet, this transition from a nomadic lifestyle to a settled lifestyle is not well understood. Meet Dr. Parkinson and learn what he has uncovered about the changes in human society.

Students can see, hear, and interact with Field Museum staff and learn about current research at the Museum. Standards aligned pre-and-post activities accompany each broadcast. 

Technology Requirements: Virtual Visits is streamed live via video conferencing. Participating classrooms need a high speed Internet connection and are encouraged to use their webcam. Classrooms are encouraged to run off of a wired connection.

Participation in a pre-broadcast technology check required.

  With a Scientist With a Museum Educator
Broadcast Length 45 minutes 30 minutes
Scientist present Yes No
Museum educator present Yes Yes
Grades K-8 K-8
Curriculum Available Middle School Middle School
Standards alignment Yes Yes
Price $125 for 35 students or less

$225 for 36 students or more

$59 for 35 students

$99 for 36 students or more

Scholarships Not currently available Not currently available
Dates For information on future broadcast dates please email virtualvisits@fieldmuseum.org For information on future broadcast dates please email virtualvisits@fieldmuseum.org
Register We have no scheduled broadcasts in spring 2017. Watch a previous broadcast of From Sticks to Bricks.

We have no scheduled broadcasts in spring 2017. Watch a previous broadcast of From Sticks to Bricks.

Questions? Please contact us at virtualvisits@fieldmuseum.org