Blogs & Videos: Sciences

Archaeological ruins in the outline of a house, with trees and mountains in the background

What Ancient Houses Tell Us About McMansions and Inequality

It’s not hard to tell rich neighborhoods from poor neighborhoods. Wealthy parts of town generally have nicer cars, clean, well-groomed lawns, and, most strikingly, giant sprawling mansions. It’s nothing new: across cultures, wealth and power have been tied to large homes for thousands of years.  

Two images, one of a man with braids in a chef's coat plating several identical dishes; and several cobs of corn of different colors laid out flat

The Sioux Chef: Reinvigorating Indigenous Food Systems

Images: Sean Sherman by Rina Oh for the James Beard Foundation; corn cobs from Cottonwood Canyon, Utah, in the Museum's collection.  By Monica Rickert-Bolter, volunteer for the North American Anthropology Program People are growing more concerned with what they put into their bodies, and it’s not just because they’re trying to keep the pounds off. Americans constantly debate which foods should be restricted and which are acceptable to consume to remain healthy.

A bright green field with a large leafy tree and sheep grazing

Closing the Clam Case and Wrapping Up a Norwegian Expedition

This is the final post in a series by Associate Curator of Invertebrate Zoology Janet R. Voight following her expedition to Norway. There, she and colleagues searched for a wood-boring clam, Xylophaga dorsalis, to study its, well, poo. Read the first post to explore the full journey.

Two people wearing hard hats on a boat, leaning over and examining mud on the deck

Searching for Sunken Treasure in the Fjords of Norway

This is the tenth in a series of posts by Associate Curator of Invertebrate Zoology Janet R. Voight as she heads out on an expedition to Norway. There, she and colleagues will look for a wood-boring clam, Xylophaga dorsalis, to study its, well, poo. Read the first post and stay tuned for upcoming posts to find out what they discover.

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