Blogs & Videos: Bats

Six adorable Halloween animals that will make you re-evaluate your ideas of “scary”

Yes, Halloween's all about things that go bump in the night, but at The Field Museum, we're also all about seeing the beauty (and yes, the cuteness) in the natural world. Here are some of our favorite animals that get a bad rap but are actually pretty gosh-darn adorable. 1. Honduran White Bats

Eight behind-the-scenes specimens that will haunt your dreams

The Field Museum is home to about 30 million objects—including a handful of super creepy ones. Here are some of our favorites that walk the line between scientifically valuable and downright horrifying. 1. Freezers full of dead animals deer_head.jpg

Not One, Not Two, But Four New Species!

In our recent history, it has not been uncommon for scientists to collect plant and animal specimens from the remotest corners of our planet, and then bring them home to be a part of a collection at a museum.  It’s also not uncommon for some of these specimens to remain undescribed (meaning that no official characterization of the animal has been published in the scientific literature) for years, due to the large number of specimens in the collection.  Many times, new species have been discovered hiding among the specimens in a collection, sometimes 50 years after the specimen was collected.  Of course, it helps if the animal is fossilized – this is the reason scientists are still discovering new species of dinosaurs that once walked the earth!

2009 REU Intern Austin Hicks

Do some nocturnal primates and bats see in colour?

AUSTIN HICKS Junior Molecular Biology major at Loyola University REU Mentors: Dr. Robert Martin (A. Watson Armour III Curator of Biological Anthropology, Anthropology) and Edna Davion (Graduate Student, Anthropology) Symposium Presentation Title: Do Hipposiderid Bats See in Color? (Chordata: Mammalia: Chiroptera: Rhinolophidae)

2009 REU Intern Anna Sjodin

Vampires on vampires?: Coevolution of bats and bat flies

ANNA SJODIN Sophomore Biology and Ecology major at Loyola University FMNH REU Mentors: Dr. Bruce Patterson (MacArthur Curator, Zoology/Mammals) and Dr. Carl Dick, (Postdoctoral Fellow, Zoology/Insects) Symposium Presentation Title: The Vampire’s Vampire: Bats and Blood-Feeding Fly Parasites (Chordata: Mammalia: Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae; Arthropoda: Hexapoda: Diptera: Hippoboscoidea)