Blogs & Videos: Fishes

Fishes in Guatemala: Las Verapaces

After a couple of days filled with sorting out logistics, and driving away from Guatemala City, we have sampled at our first localities (Las Verapaces - Baja Verapaz and Alta Verapaz Departments). Our localities so far have centered around the Rio Escondido and Rio Cahabon, both north of Guatemala City. We found livebearing fishes of the family Poeciliidae (e.g. Pseudoxiphophorous spp., Poecilia mexicana), as well as cichlids, tetras, and catfish.

Fishes goes to Guatemala - Follow us in the field!

Next week our staff in Fishes at The Field Museum will be leaving the cold, snowy days of Chicago to study neotropical fishes in the Central American country of Guatemala!  The Field Museum has always been an important institution for studying the biodiversity of fishes in the tropical rainforests of Mexico, Central America, and South America.  On this expedition our Fishes staff will continue to build on our fish collections from the region so that we can answer even more questions.

2010 REU Intern Emily Rudick

Comparative Gill and Labial Palp Morphology (Mollusca: Bivalvia)

EMILY LAUREN RUDICK Sophomore Biology major at Temple University, College of Science and Technology REU Mentors: Dr. Rüdiger Bieler (Curator, Zoology, Invertebrates) and Dr. Ana Glavinic (Postdoctoral Fellow, Zoology, Invertebrates) Symposium Presentation Title: Comparative Gill and Labial Palp Morphology (Mollusca: Bivalvia)

Sharks Sharks Sharks & More Sharks

There are 12 living Orders of sharks and rays swimming in our oceans today, and more than 440 known species. Here are some of the wackier ones!  Thanks to Caleb McMahan and Sue Mochel for their help in producing this episode and allowing us to film in the Fishes collection area! Special thanks to David Shiffman (@whysharksmatter) for his help, support, advice, and fun facts about sharks! Additional thanks to Joe Hanson (ItsOkayToBeSmart) and the folks at PBS Digital Studios for helping to put this great series together. :) 

Dunkbot

In 2008, I had an opportunity to help Mark Westneat Ph.D with construction of a Biomechanical model of a Dunkelosteous, a prehistoric fish, to test its bite strength. The model was filmed for an episode of History Channel’s series “Evolve”. We had a three-minute segment in the “Jaws and Claws” episode. We smashed all kinds of stuff in the jaws, and had a generally good time. The model is currently on display with the Field Museum’s exhibition, Biomechanics: The Machine Inside.

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