Blogs & Videos: Fossils

Three carved pumpkins: one with a dinosaur skull design, one with two elephants, and one with a lion.

Pumpkin Stencils: SUE, Fighting African Elephants, and a Tsavo Lion

For Halloween, give your pumpkins some natural history flair with these stencils inspired by famous Field Museum specimens. To create your pumpkin design, download and print a stencil, then cut out the yellow areas. Show us your handiwork on Twitter, Instagram, or Facebook

Chihuahua-sized fossil "beardogs" shed new light on evolution of dogs and their relatives

Fossil discoveries don’t always happen out in the field, with scientists armed with pick-axes realizing they’ve found something special. Sometimes, fossils lie in wait in museum collections until the right researcher comes along and realizes there’s something unusual about them. That’s what happened this time, and the fossils in question are prehistoric dog relatives called “beardogs.”

SUE Lends a Hand: Field Museum Scientists Remove T. rex’s Arm for Argonne Study

Two Field Museum scientists are leaving their labs and going face-to-face with SUE, the biggest Tyrannosaurus rex ever discovered, armed only with a wrench. And they’re going to take her arm off. SUE’s not just the world’s biggest T. rex—she’s also the best-preserved and most complete one. And that means that she contains a treasure trove of information for paleontologists to learn from.

Dinosaur Discovery & Updates on Cloud Rats

Natural News from The Field Museum | Ep. 1 We’re kicking off the first episode in our new news series, Natural News from The Field Museum! Stay tuned for the next installment in two weeks, and check out our behind-the-scenes tour of the set next week right here on The Brain Scoop. ----------------------------------------­----------------------------- Papers/Articles:  1. 'Dinosaur Discovery'

Ask A Curator: Q&A With Paleobiologist Ken Angielczyk

Being a curator at a natural history museum can include many different areas of work, from doing research and studying collections, to field work and training future scientists. Dr. Ken Angielczyk, an associate curator and paleobiologist at The Field Museum, shares some of the unique aspects of his work. Ask @FieldMuseum all your natural history and science questions on Wednesday, September 14, for #AskACurator Day! What does being a curator mean to you?

Photo of dinosaur skeleton

How well do you know SUE?

The towering Tyrannosaurus rex that greets visitors at The Field Museum is hard to miss. But how well do you really know SUE? To celebrate SUE’s Unearth Day on August 12, the date she was discovered, we’re brushing up on some essential facts: Who is SUE? Even though we refer to SUE as a “she,” it is unknown whether this T. rex was female or male. We know that this carnivorous dinosaur lived about 67 million years ago and probably weighed nine tons during its life.

Illustrations of a glyptodont (large armadillo-like animal) and a spotted ironclad beetle

Extreme Animals Competition: Glyptodont v. Ironclad Beetle

In the Extreme Animals Competition, we’re looking at some of the fastest, fiercest, and strongest members of the animal kingdom. In the Armored Defenders category, the extinct glyptodont and the extant ironclad beetle are known for their built-in body armor. Glyptodont: Walking suit of armor Vital stats: 

Newly-discovered dinosaur had “T. rex arms” that evolved independently

Scientists still aren’t sure why T. rex had those absurdly small forelimbs, but apparently the look was all the rage in the Late Cretaceous. A newly-discovered dinosaur from Patagonia has similar short, two-fingered claws, even though it’s not closely related to the tyrannosaurs.

Four Fossil Sharks That Are Cooler Than Megalodon

Megalodon is the T. rex of the prehistoric shark world—it might have looked like a Great White, only way, way bigger, and it’s everybody’s favorite. It’s had its moment in the sun, even starring in a fake Shark Week documentary saying that it’d been found in modern waters (don’t worry—megalodon has been extinct for millions of years). But The Field Museum is home to some really bizarre sharks that lived millions of years before dinosaurs were even a twinkle in the universe’s eye.