Blogs & Videos: Geology

Beachgoer’s Guide to Lake Michigan Fossils and Rocks

When you think of Lake Michigan, does fossil hunting come to mind? Many people may not be aware that the beaches of Lake Michigan can be a hot spot for fossils hunters. Aside from fossils, Lake Michigan beaches are also home to many fascinating rocks. Take a look at some of the more common rocks and fossils around the lake.  

Four Fascinating Meteorites That Provide Clues to Understanding Our Solar System

Meteorites have been falling to Earth for literally hundreds of millions of years—and continue to land here today. Our Meteorites exhibition features rare and fascinating meteorites, from fossil meteorites to a meteorite on Mars. 

Facts Matter at The Field Museum

In science, we're constantly striving to make new discoveries and gain a better understanding of life, nature, and the world around us.  Watch as some of our science communicators and experts take us on a tour through the Evolving Planet exhibition, showcasing just a few of many science facts you can find here. At The Field Museum, we're always doing research and learning more, and we invite you to be curious and explore the facts alongside us.

What Do We Mean When We Talk About Facts in Science?

The use of the words “fact”, “hypothesis”, and “theory” in science can be confusing, especially if conducting research isn’t your everyday job! But these terms have specific meanings, and they’re part of an important process that scientists use to gather information about the world around us. First, some quick definitions—here’s how scientists at The Field Museum (and around the world) use these terms:

Bright Fireball Over the Midwest

On Monday, February 6, 2017, around 1:30am local time, many inhabitants of the Midwest saw a bright fireball shooting across the night sky. Some even heard a sonic boom. The Field Museum's Invertebrate Collections Manager Paul Mayer woke up from the sonic boom: "I was staying in Fredonia, Wisconsin and was woken up by a large boom that shook the whole house. It sounded like thunder and I thought maybe it was a train hitting something. I got up and looked out the window, but did not see anything.

Today’s rare meteorites were once common

Four hundred and sixty-six million years ago, there was a giant collision in outer space. Something hit an asteroid and broke it apart, sending chunks of rock falling to Earth as meteorites since before the time of the dinosaurs. But what kinds of meteorites were making their way to Earth before that collision? In a new study in Nature Astronomy, Field Museum scientists have tackled that question by creating the first reconstruction of the distribution of meteorite types before the collision.

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