Blogs & Videos: Geology

Video: We Are All Stardust

When a meteor hits the earth, there is the possibility that it brings something very rare along with it:  cosmic stardust older than our Solar System.   Dr. Philipp Heck uses a combination of astronomy, geosciences and chemistry, to hunt for these presolar grains, which offer glimpses into our galaxy's past.  Read more about Philipp's research and the Pritzker Center for Meteoritics and Polar Studies.

From First Grade to the Field Museum: A Paleontologist's Research Comes Full Circle

If you take sample of paleontologists and ask them how they became interested in the field of paleontology, some of them will doubtlessly tell you that they first got hooked on dinosaurs as a kid and things proceeded from there. I am definitely an example of this phenomenon: as far back as I can remember I was fascinated by dinosaurs, and “paleontologist” was almost always the answer when people asked what I wanted to be when I grew up.

"Battle Mountain" Meteorite Donated

On September 24, Collections & Research Committee Member and private meteorite collector Terry Boudreaux donated and loaned specimens of a freshly fallen meteorite to the Museum’s Robert A. Pritzker Center for Meteoritics and Polar Studies. The meteorite produced a fireball associated with a sonic boom before it hit the ground near Battle Mountain, NV on August 23. The meteorite is tentatively classified as an ordinary chondrite of type L6. 

Rare Meteorite from California Fireball to be Donated to The Field Museum

The Field Museum will receive a high-quality meteorite from a fireball that exploded over California and Nevada last month. The 4.6-billion-year-old meteorite, donated by private collector Terry Boudreaux, is extremely rare and valuable to science. It weighs about one-third of an ounce (10 grams) and has been tentatively classified as carbonaceous chondrite.

Study on sulfur-rich comet dust published

Robert A. Pritzker Assistant Curator of Meteoritics and Polar Studies Philipp Heck and co-authors from the Max-Planck-Institute for Chemistry in Germany had their paper on the first isotopic analysis of sulfur-rich comet dust published in the April issue of the journal Meteoritics & Planetary Science. The dust was captured during a flyby of Comet Wild 2 by NASA’s Stardust Mission and returned to Earth.

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