Blogs & Videos: Mammals

The Man-Eating Lions of Tsavo

In 1898, two African lions began attacking and consuming railway workers in Tsavo, Kenya. First reports estimated that 135 people fell victim to these "man-eaters," but further research published in 2009 lessened that number to 35 individuals. Over the years, different theories as to what motivated these attacks have varied, and recently we got to talk with two experts who are working towards finding an answer. 
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Illustrations of a glyptodont (large armadillo-like animal) and a spotted ironclad beetle

Extreme Animals Competition: Glyptodont v. Ironclad Beetle

In the Extreme Animals Competition, we’re looking at some of the fastest, fiercest, and strongest members of the animal kingdom. In the Armored Defenders category, the extinct glyptodont and the extant ironclad beetle are known for their built-in body armor. Glyptodont: Walking suit of armor Vital stats: 

Side by side illustrations of an antelope-like animal and a falcon

Extreme Animals Competition: Pronghorn v. Peregrine Falcon

In our Extreme Animals Competition, we’re looking at some of the fastest, fiercest, and strongest members of the animal kingdom. Representing the Speedy Sprinters category, the pronghorn and the peregrine falcon are two of the quickest animals on land and in the sky. Pronghorn: Outrunning the competition Vital stats: 

The Flapper and the Panda

In 1936, Ruth Harkness - a dressmaker from New York -- set off to China in search of the rare, elusive Giant Panda. Her goal? Bring one back alive to share the wonder of China's wildlife with the western world. She became the first explorer to do so, and so set in motion a public fascination with these creatures that continues 80 years later. Additional images c/o Ruth Harkness, "The Lady and the Panda," 1938, and the Chicago Zoological Society. 

Ridiculously cute mouse lemurs hold key to Madagascar’s past

Today, Madagascar is home to a mosaic of different habitats—a lush rainforest in the east and a dry deciduous forest in the west, separated by largely open highlands. But the island off the southeast coast of Africa hasn’t always been like that—a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences announces that these two ecologically different portions of the island were once linked by a patchwork of forested areas. And to figure it out, the scientists analyzed the DNA of some of the cutest animals on earth—mouse lemurs.

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