Blogs & Videos: Mammals

A skunk with a white zigzag pattern walking on a log

Spotted Skunk Evolution Driven by Climate Change

Climate plays a key role in determining what animals can live where. And while human-induced climate change has been causing major problems for wildlife as of late, changes in the Earth’s climate have impacted evolution for millions of years—offering tantalizing clues into how to protect animals facing climate change today.

A small rat sitting on a bright green plant, nibbling a leaf

Bramble Cay Melomys: The First Mammal Extinct from Climate Change Caused by Humans?

The Bramble Cay melomys (Melomys rubicola) was a small rat with one of the most unusual distributions of all mammals. As far as we know, the only place it occurred was the tiny Bramble Cay in the eastern Torres Strait, at the tip of northern Australia.

A yellowed animal skull with large canine teeth, on a white surface and backdrop

What Makes a Man-Eater? Check the Teeth

In 1898, Lieutenant Colonel John Patterson shot two man-eating lions that killed dozens of workers building a railroad in Tsavo, Kenya. He wrote, “I have a very vivid recollection of one particular night when the brutes seized a man from the railway station and brought him close to my camp to devour.

Facts Matter at The Field Museum

In science, we're constantly striving to make new discoveries and gain a better understanding of life, nature, and the world around us.  Watch as some of our science communicators and experts take us on a tour through the Evolving Planet exhibition, showcasing just a few of many science facts you can find here. At The Field Museum, we're always doing research and learning more, and we invite you to be curious and explore the facts alongside us.

Top 10 Science, Nature, and Culture Stories of 2016

Need a break from the holiday madness? Curl up with our 10 most-read blog posts of the year for a brain refresh (plus, some fun science facts to share with your visiting in-laws or your New Year’s Eve party guests). From Tully monsters to SUE’s missing arm to local birds, plants, and culture, it’s been a wild ride. Thanks for joining us on these adventures and discoveries, and stay curious with us in 2017!

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