Blogs & Videos: Marine Animals

North Carolina Zoo polar bear habitat with fake rocks and painted lichens

Attention to lichen detail in the polar bear habitat

One of the best zoos Collections Manager Robert Lücking has ever visited is the North Carolina Zoo, with its vast area allowing much space for its animals. Also, the attention to detail is quite amazing. Many dioramas include rock features made out of various materials including concrete, specifically designed to meet the animals' needs. What is astonishing, however, that the designers and builders even took care to mimic lichens growing on these fake rocks, and even on close-up these look so real that one has to make sure they are not just paint.

2010 REU Intern Emily Rudick

Comparative Gill and Labial Palp Morphology (Mollusca: Bivalvia)

EMILY LAUREN RUDICK Sophomore Biology major at Temple University, College of Science and Technology REU Mentors: Dr. Rüdiger Bieler (Curator, Zoology, Invertebrates) and Dr. Ana Glavinic (Postdoctoral Fellow, Zoology, Invertebrates) Symposium Presentation Title: Comparative Gill and Labial Palp Morphology (Mollusca: Bivalvia)

Video: A Sea Monster Named Jim

Olivier Rieppel and Jim Holstein tell the tale of the giant Lizard Eating Sovereign of the Sea (named Jim!). Touted as the "T. rex of the Sea," the Triassic sea monster was unearthed and brought back to The Field Museum where we hope to learn more about this new species. Research into this fascinating creature may teach us something about biodiversity crises and the recovery of ecosystems, both past and present.

Video: Leo on Bioluminescence

Beyond the reach of sunlight, thousands of feet below the surface of the ocean, some creatures create their own light known as "bioluminescence." Take a trip through the mind of Leo Smith, who asks questions about deep sea fish evolution. Patterns in diversity can offer clues to why fish have evolved so many ways of brightening up the deep sea. Some seem to use light to blend into their surroundings, others to lure prey out of the surroundings, or even to attract mates.

2009 REU Intern William Adams

The early evolution of sea turtles

WILLIAM ADAMS Junior Biology major at Loyola University REU Mentors: Dr. Kenneth D. Angielczyk (Assistant Curator of Paleomammalogy, Geology) and Dr. James Parham (Postdoctoral Research Associate, Biodiversity Synthesis Center) Symposium Presentation Title: A Geometric Morphometric Analysis of Plastron Morphology in Marine Chelonioids and their Relatives (Chordata: Reptilia: Testudines: Chelonioidea)