Chicagoland Butterfly Gallery

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Published: October 26, 2012

The Man Who Mistook His Tarantula for a Hat

Katherine Webbink, Information Systems Specialist, Information Technology

Collections Assistant Jim Louderman wears many hats (some of which are tarantulas). In addition to preparing specimens for the Field Museum's Insect Collection, he collects insects and arachnids around Illinois and the central U.S., and participates in numerous public outreach programs.

Collections Assistant Jim Louderman wears many hats (some of which are tarantulas). In addition to preparing specimens for the Field Museum's Insect Collection, he collects insects and arachnids around Illinois and the central U.S., and participates in numerous public outreach programs.


Katherine Webbink

In the Technology Department, Kate works on cataloging the Field Museum's digital media--how do we preserve the digital media bits of natural history? For now, the answer here seems to involve a lot of DNGs. Going forward, digital formats and the workflows that go with them change all the time, so collections need to stay on their toes if they don't want to lose data and the ideas that go with them.

Published: July 27, 2012

A Century of Butterflies and Moths

Katherine Webbink, Information Systems Specialist, Information Technology

Collection Manager Jim Boone takes us on a tour through the Herman Strecker Moth and Butterfly Collection. The history of the collection and some its most interesting specimens are explored.

Collection Manager Jim Boone takes us on a tour through the Herman Strecker Moth and Butterfly Collection. The history of the collection and some its most interesting specimens are explored.


Katherine Webbink

In the Technology Department, Kate works on cataloging the Field Museum's digital media--how do we preserve the digital media bits of natural history? For now, the answer here seems to involve a lot of DNGs. Going forward, digital formats and the workflows that go with them change all the time, so collections need to stay on their toes if they don't want to lose data and the ideas that go with them.

Arthropod Collections

The Field Museum's Insect Collection contains worldwide collections of Arthropoda (excluding Crustacea) that rank fifth in overall size among North American collections. At present, the collection includes approximately 4.1 million pinned insects and 8 million specimens or lots of insects and other arthropods in alcohol or on microscope slides. The collection receives heavy use by US and international visitors and borrowers. Collection data are now available online in KE EMu for many parts of the collection:

Lepidoptera Collection

The collection has been inventoried and curated at the species level. Integration of the Strecker and several smaller collections with the main collection was completed along with moving and rehousing the entire Lepidoptera (butterfly and moth) collection in new cabinets. The Strecker collection specimen data and comprehensive inventory data are both presented here.

 

The Division of Insects covers insects, arachnids (spiders and their relatives), and myriapods (millipedes, centipedes and their relatives). Our curators and collection management staff work together closely to maintain a world-class collection of more than 12 million  specimens, over half the Museum's holdings.

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