Fossils

Rendering of the interior of a large, white classical building with large green gardens hanging from the ceiling

Return to the Age of the Dinosaurs: 35-foot Pterosaurs and Hanging Gardens Are Joining the Titanosaur

In the spring of 2018, we’ll unveil a cast of the largest dinosaur ever discovered: a 122-foot-long titanosaur is coming to our main Stanley Field Hall. And while SUE the T. rex is moving to their own new gallery, the titanosaur won’t be lonely—it’ll be joined by life-size replicas of giant flying reptiles and hanging gardens inspired by plants that lived alongside dinosaurs, like ferns, cycads, and arums.

Ask A Curator: Q&A With Paleobiologist Ken Angielczyk

Being a curator at a natural history museum can include many different areas of work, from doing research and studying collections, to field work and training future scientists. Dr. Ken Angielczyk, an associate curator and paleobiologist at The Field Museum, shares some of the unique aspects of his work.

Beachgoer’s Guide to Lake Michigan Fossils and Rocks

When you think of Lake Michigan, does fossil hunting come to mind? Many people may not be aware that the beaches of Lake Michigan can be a hot spot for fossils hunters. Aside from fossils, Lake Michigan beaches are also home to many fascinating rocks. Take a look at some of the more common rocks and fossils around the lake.  

A tray filled with elongated eggs that are white, cream and brown in color

Before the Chicken, There Was the (Dinosaur) Egg

While we don’t know a whole lot about dinosaur reproduction, we have much more information about what happens after mating. That’s because the fossil record of eggs and nests is quite good. Like living reptiles, dinosaurs buried their eggs, which appear to have had long incubation periods—up to half a year. 

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