Dinosaurs

A tray filled with elongated eggs that are white, cream and brown in color

Before the Chicken, There Was the (Dinosaur) Egg

While we don’t know a whole lot about dinosaur reproduction, we have much more information about what happens after mating. That’s because the fossil record of eggs and nests is quite good. Like living reptiles, dinosaurs buried their eggs, which appear to have had long incubation periods—up to half a year. 

Facts Matter at The Field Museum

In science, we're constantly striving to make new discoveries and gain a better understanding of life, nature, and the world around us.  Watch as some of our science communicators and experts take us on a tour through the Evolving Planet exhibition, showcasing just a few of many science facts you can find here. At The Field Museum, we're always doing research and learning more, and we invite you to be curious and explore the facts alongside us.

Three dinosaur skeletons with different horns on their heads, lined up in an exhibition

How Did Dinosaurs Woo Their Mates?

We’re confident dinosaurs didn't attract their mates with flowers and chocolates, but it’s hard to say for sure what DID go down. Once you look past the commercialism, Valentine’s Day boils down to the irrepressible natural forces of affection and desire. Underlying these forces is our drive to reproduce—so it may be timely to ask what we know about dinosaur reproduction.

2016 By The Numbers

It's been an exciting year here at The Field Museum: we explored nature and culture all around the globe, continued making discoveries within our collections, and invited visitors to learn with us. To stay in touch and see what we're up to in 2017, sign up for our newsletter at fieldmuseum.org/newsletter and become a member at fieldmuseum.org/membership.  

Top 10 Science, Nature, and Culture Stories of 2016

Need a break from the holiday madness? Curl up with our 10 most-read blog posts of the year for a brain refresh (plus, some fun science facts to share with your visiting in-laws or your New Year’s Eve party guests). From Tully monsters to SUE’s missing arm to local birds, plants, and culture, it’s been a wild ride. Thanks for joining us on these adventures and discoveries, and stay curious with us in 2017!

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