Fossils

Seeing Double: How The Field Museum Makes Fossil Casts

Lumbering bear-like creatures that browsed Paleocene forests called pantodonts are some of the many fossil mammals immortalized at The Field Museum. They’re some of the first large mammals after the extinction of dinosaurs, and despite their intimidating canine teeth, they were herbivores. While these animals were likely a dominant species in their time, today they are represented by a limited number of excavated fossil specimens.

The Origin of Mammal Movement: Harvard Adventures, Part I

Paleontologists today look at more than just fossil evidence to learn about organisms that lived millions of years ago. In this case, we're seeking to answer the question: how, and when, did mammals evolve their specialized movements? Turns out, the next step in this process involves dissecting a giant weasel.  This is part one in a three-part series supported in part by The Field Museum, the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard University, and The National Science Foundation (!!!!). 

“Fire Frogs” and Eel-like Amphibians: Meet The Field’s Newest Fossil Discoveries

Two hundred and seventy-eight million years ago, the world was a different place. Not only were the landmasses merged into the supercontinent of Pangaea, but the land was home to ancient animals unlike anything alive today. But until now, very little information was available about what animals were present in the southern tropics.

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