Published: August 30, 2012

Piecing Together Early Societies

Katherine Webbink, Information Systems Specialist, Information Technology

Bill Parkinson studies 6500-year-old societies in eastern Europe. How did those societies form? How have they changed into the world we see today? How can anthropologists find out about them after all this time, with all the dirt, mud, and rocks in the way? It seems to take a village--a multidisciplinary, long-term village of devoted researchers including Attila Gyucha and Rick Yerkes with the Koros Regional Archaeological Project. 

Bill Parkinson studies 6500-year-old societies in eastern Europe. How did those societies form? How have they changed into the world we see today? How can anthropologists find out about them after all this time, with all the dirt, mud, and rocks in the way? It seems to take a village--a multidisciplinary, long-term village of devoted researchers including Attila Gyucha and Rick Yerkes with the Koros Regional Archaeological Project. 

To see what a Neolithic settlement in Hungary might have looked like, fly through this 3D reconstruction of a Tisza settlement, made by Bill's colleagues at the Institute for Mediterranean Studies.


Katherine Webbink

In the Technology Department, Kate works on cataloging the Field Museum's digital media--how do we preserve the digital media bits of natural history? For now, the answer here seems to involve a lot of DNGs. Going forward, digital formats and the workflows that go with them change all the time, so collections need to stay on their toes if they don't want to lose data and the ideas that go with them.