Blogs & Videos

Every day at The Field Museum we're exploring something new, whether it's hidden deep in our collections or being investigated out in the field. Tune in to our blogs and videos to learn about breakthrough discoveries firsthand from our Field Museum scientists, or discover what curiosity Emily Graslie has stumbled upon in our vaults, or see how our science is making an impact in the world around you.

Recent Blog Posts

“Scarface”: The Dachshund-sized Pre-mammal with a (Possibly) Venomous Bite

Two hundred and fifty-two million years ago, huge volcanic eruptions triggered a mass extinction bigger than the one that ended the dinosaurs, changing life on earth forever. Field Museum scientist Ken Angielczyk and his colleagues are now studying this event, the Permian-Triassic Extinction, to learn about how communities bounce back after falling apart. And one newly discovered ancient mammal relative is helping them get closer to their answers—meet “Scarface.”

Monsters Storm The Field

Invertebrate paleontologists aren’t afraid of anything, so when Collections Manager Paul Mayer was offered a chance to add hundreds of monsters to The Field’s collections, he jumped at the opportunity. The monsters in question, Tully monsters, are just a small part of the enormous donation of Thomas V. Testa’s collection of Mazon Creek fossils that The Field Museum just received from Field Associate Jack Wittry.  

A tropical wanderer visits the Midwest

Photo © Nathan Goldberg, taken in St. Joseph, Berrien Co., Michigan, on 11 July 2015. I was riding south on the lakefront bike path, like I do most mornings, on my way to the museum. It was a lovely morning, cool, overcast, and with a nice tailwind. I passed the construction fence at Fullerton Avenue and glanced towards the water, as I do frequently during my ride. Then I nearly fell off my bike. A frigatebird was flying over!

Peregrine Falcons Removed from IL Endangered List

Peregrine Falcons have their share of claims to fame—with a diving speed of over 200 miles per hour, they’re the fastest animals in the world, and they’ve adapted from living on rocky cliffs to a different kind of “mountain”: Chicago’s skyscrapers.  But in 1951, there were none left in Illinois, and it looked as if the species would be wiped out of North America entirely. Today, thanks largely to the Chicago Peregrine Program headed by The Field Museum’s Mary Hennen, Peregrines are flourishing to the point that they’re no longer in immediate danger.

New Discoveries in How Animal Moms-to-Be Feed Their Babies

  Pop quiz—what kinds of animal mothers feed their babies before birth? The first (and maybe only) ones to come to mind are probably mammals like us—moms-to-be funnel nutrients from their blood supply right to their developing embryos through an organ called the placenta; the moms literally “eat for two.” That’s a different kind of nourishment than you see in most other animals—the majority lay eggs with a nutritious yolk for the embryo to use as it develops.

Voices of Conservation - Viva Yeboah

Viva Yeboah is the Founder of Outdoor Afro Chicago. Born in Georgia and a DePaul graduate in Accounting, a younger Viva Yeboah wouldn't have believed that playing such a huge part in Chicago’s conservation field would be in her future. However, her chapter of Outdoor Afro has changed the outdoor recreation world and challenges the belief that people of color don't partake in the environment and its conservation.

Voices of Conservation - Maritza Rocha

“There is money being spent on preventing kids to get pregnant or not involved in gangs but there’s no money being used to help them reconnect with the surroundings that have created them.”  Dedicated to making sure Pilsen's children have a healthy environment, Maritza Rocha is the Director of Youth Services at Mujeres Latinas en Accion.  A native of Chicago, she grew up in the Pilsen, the lower Westside, and Bridgeport. She attended DePaul University, intending on becoming a lawyer, but the need to bring knowledge to her people was much stronger.

Voices of Conservation - Credell Walls

Credell Walls is a Community Engagement Specialist with the Forest Preserves of Cook County. “Having youth go out and do stewardship work, remove an invasive species, making a difference in different areas of their lives, I think it helps them see their life a little better than they did before.” Walls prides himself on creating opportunities for youth. He graduated from DePaul University and is working on his master’s in biology at the University of Miami, he has the ability to show youth how to love the world they live in.

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