Blogs & Videos

Every day at The Field Museum we're exploring something new, whether it's hidden deep in our collections or being investigated out in the field. Tune in to our blogs and videos to learn about breakthrough discoveries firsthand from our Field Museum scientists, discover curiosities in our vaults with Emily Graslie, or see how our science is making an impact in the world around you.

Recent Blog Posts

Dinosaur Discovery & Updates on Cloud Rats

Natural News from The Field Museum | Ep. 1 We’re kicking off the first episode in our new news series, Natural News from The Field Museum! Stay tuned for the next installment in two weeks, and check out our behind-the-scenes tour of the set next week right here on The Brain Scoop. ----------------------------------------­----------------------------- Papers/Articles:  1. 'Dinosaur Discovery'

Hallway with natural history images on the walls, with #AskACurator and @FieldMuseum printed over it

Ask A Curator Day: Insects, Birds, Fossils, Meteorites, and More!

Join us for #AskACurator Day on Wednesday, September 14! Bring all your questions related to natural history, science, museum collections, and research. We’ll be taking questions throughout the day on Twitter @FieldMuseum, along with a livestream on Facebook and scientists taking questions on their own Twitter handles. Here are just a few topics Field Museum scientists are eager to talk about (all times mentioned are CT): 

Ask A Curator: Q&A With Paleobiologist Ken Angielczyk

Being a curator at a natural history museum can include many different areas of work, from doing research and studying collections, to field work and training future scientists. Dr. Ken Angielczyk, an associate curator and paleobiologist at The Field Museum, shares some of the unique aspects of his work. Ask @FieldMuseum all your natural history and science questions on Wednesday, September 14, for #AskACurator Day! What does being a curator mean to you?

How the Hunt for the Philosopher’s Stone Led to Phosphorus

What glows in the dark, is flammable, and was first discovered in human urine? While this substance may sound dangerous (and a little gross), it exists in foods we eat and in the world around us. We’re talking about phosphorus, the 13th element. Phosphorus is mainly produced in exploding massive stars, known as core-collapse supernovae. It is the 18th-most abundant element in the universe and the 13th-most abundant element in Earth’s crust.

We’ve got ’em! Meet the Real-Life Amphibians and Reptiles of Pokémon

We’ve got ’em…in glass jars! The worldwide phenomenon of Pokémon was originally inspired by the practice of collecting insects, which is something we still do at the Museum today. In the midst of battling monsters and stopping criminal organizations, it’s easy to forget that, at the start of every Pokémon game, every player is sent out on a journey to complete the PokéDex, a digital encyclopedia of every Pokémon known to man.

The Man-Eating Lions of Tsavo

In 1898, two African lions began attacking and consuming railway workers in Tsavo, Kenya. First reports estimated that 135 people fell victim to these "man-eaters," but further research published in 2009 lessened that number to 35 individuals. Over the years, different theories as to what motivated these attacks have varied, and recently we got to talk with two experts who are working towards finding an answer. 

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