Blogs & Videos

Every day at The Field Museum we're exploring something new, whether it's hidden deep in our collections or being investigated out in the field. Tune in to our blogs and videos to learn about breakthrough discoveries firsthand from our Field Museum scientists, discover curiosities in our vaults with Emily Graslie, or see how our science is making an impact in the world around you.

Recent Blog Posts

Three carved pumpkins: one with a dinosaur skull design, one with two elephants, and one with a lion.

Pumpkin Stencils: SUE, Fighting African Elephants, and a Tsavo Lion

For Halloween, give your pumpkins some natural history flair with these stencils inspired by famous Field Museum specimens. To create your pumpkin design, download and print a stencil, then cut out the yellow areas. Show us your handiwork on Twitter, Instagram, or Facebook

Why did King Tut have a flat head?

Artificial cranial deformation, or head binding, is a practice carried out by cultures all over the world, and throughout time. Dr. Robert Martin talked to us about how the tradition was implemented by figures of high status in Ancient Egypt. 
Read more about Dr. Martin's work and research. More info + Links! ----------------------------------------­-----------------------------

Chihuahua-sized fossil "beardogs" shed new light on evolution of dogs and their relatives

Fossil discoveries don’t always happen out in the field, with scientists armed with pick-axes realizing they’ve found something special. Sometimes, fossils lie in wait in museum collections until the right researcher comes along and realizes there’s something unusual about them. That’s what happened this time, and the fossils in question are prehistoric dog relatives called “beardogs.”

Black and white photo of a man with a mustache, next to a dried plant specimen

The Mystery of a Forgotten Botanist and a Rare Frog

Part of a Field Museum scientist’s work is continuing to uncover new things about specimens that were collected a long time ago, adding new information that enhances our understanding of the natural world. When one Field Museum collections manager started asking questions about a small frog he was studying, he didn’t suspect it would lead down such a winding road.

Botflies, Chicago Parakeets, and the Smallest Collection | Ask Emily #13

Mmmmm. Botflies.  Got a question? Give us a call! +1 (315) 367-2667 - aka 315-Em-Scoop !!! For more science stories and updates, check out our new series, 'Natural News from The Field Museum'! We're alternating that show with Brain Scoop episodes to keep things EXCITING! More info and Links!  Dinosaur Discovery & Updates on Cloud Rats | Natural News from The Field Museum | Ep. 1

SUE Lends a Hand: Field Museum Scientists Remove T. rex’s Arm for Argonne Study

Two Field Museum scientists are leaving their labs and going face-to-face with SUE, the biggest Tyrannosaurus rex ever discovered, armed only with a wrench. And they’re going to take her arm off. SUE’s not just the world’s biggest T. rex—she’s also the best-preserved and most complete one. And that means that she contains a treasure trove of information for paleontologists to learn from.